Vous pouvez emmener qui vous voulez.

I’m not sure why this isn’t amener. Maybe the person speaking is referring to a location that isn’t the one that they are presently location at. Therefore, it would be technically by emmener (“TAKING someone/an animal/a vehicle” somewhere) vs. the definition of amener which is “BRINGING someone/an animal/a vehicle” somewhere. idk. it doesn’t help that bringing and taking are often switched and/or interchanged in english

“Emmener” means we are mentally considering the situation from the perspective of the place of origin, the one we’re leaving.
“Amener” means we are mentally considering the situation from the perspective of the place of destination, the one we’re heading at.

“Vous pouvez amener qui vous voulez.” likely to be said in the situation where a person invites others to their home, and tells them: feel free to take other people to my house as well.
“Vous pouvez emmener qui vous voulez.” likely to be said by the Spanish king to Christopher Colombus before he leaves, as in: I’m staying in Spain, but I rule over everyone here, and to carry out your mission you may bring whomever you want with you.

Note that amener and emmener both refer to living beings. For inanimate objects, use apporter and emporter, which work similarly. (“Il ne l’emportera pas au paradis” is said by people on Earth; if you were dead already and in paradise, and still wanted to express the same idea, you would say instead: “Il ne l’apportera pas au paradis”)

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Thank you for the help!

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